Zionsville Times Sentinel

December 18, 2013

Meth is big business for cleanup companies

Maureen Hayden
CNHI Statehouse Bureau

---- — Donetta Held knows how strange the world of methamphetamine is.

Along with her husband, Rick, she owns one of the top meth lab cleanup companies in Indiana. When she walks into a home once occupied by a meth cook, she has to assume it's booby-trapped: Meth makers do weird things like pouring gasoline into light bulbs so if the cops bust in and flip a switch, the fixture will explode.

"If you'd told me when I was a little girl that I'd be making my living off other people's illegal activity when I grew up," Held said, "I would have said, 'There's no way.'"

But here she is, cleaning up the toxic debris of other people's illicit, messy lives.

And business, depending upon how one views it, couldn't be better.

Held was running her family-owned construction company in rural Greene County when she launched Crisis Cleaning in 2001. She started out cleaning up crime scenes. In 2007, she turned to cleaning up meth lab sites after police told her of the crying need for the service.

See Wednesday's Times Sentinel for the full story.