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Brad’s Books opened its brick and mortar store in August of 2018. Within months, they’d outgrown the space near Parkview Pharmacy. Last summer, they opened in the former Radio Shack space near Walmart. With four times the space than the previous spot, owner Angela Clouser says they’ve finally got the room for the store they wanted to have all along. Selling used books (all of which are donated) and offering a community-centered reading and gathering spot is what the store is about.

We're always interested in hearing about news in our community. Let us know what's going on!

editor's pick

The Indiana Court of Appeals this week upheld the murder conviction the man who gunned down 82-year-old John Clements as Clements went outside to get his mail at his Zionsville home in 2016.

Dear Rusty: If I have reached full retirement age (FRA) and wish to sell a $500,000 asset, will it affect my wife’s Social Security if we file jointly? I have heard that it will affect my Medicare (the amount withheld each month) but she still has three more years before she can receive benefits. Is it better to liquidate assets before she reaches FRA if we will be penalized? Would her Medicare be affected as well as mine? Signed: Planning Ahead

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Friends, family and colleagues gathered at the Boone County Courthouse annex Tuesday to bid Cindy Murphy farewell as the longtime administrator and nursing division director of the Boone County Health Department.

Officials with Hospital for Behavioral Medicine, Hendricks Regional Health, the Town of Plainfield and Hendricks County Commissioners will gather for a groundbreaking of the Hospital for Behavioral Medicine at 3 p.m. Feb. 24.

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The Boone County Breeders and Feeders fish fry and awards banquet is set for 6:30 p.m. March 5 at the Farm Bureau 4-H Community Building at the Boone County 4-H Fairgrounds in Lebanon. A highlight of the program is the recognition of Boone County’s Distinguished Agriculture Career Award winners.

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Since 1999, plans to widen County Road 300 South have been included in the Boone County Highway Department’s comprehensive plan. At Tuesday’s meeting of the Boone County Commissioners, a preliminary plan and cost estimate was introduced.

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This is the first in a string of stories where we will explore the historically significant places, structures, and buildings that make Boone County unique.The best place to start, of course, is at the top. So let’s tour the centerpiece of the county, the Boone County Courthouse - specifically its ornate dome.In 1986, the courthouse was entered into the inventory of the National Historic Register, a division of the United States Department of the Interior National Parks Service. This is not an light undertaking. The application on file with the NPS shows that the process began about four years prior to the final approval. Contrary to popular belief, a structure with this designation is NOT prohibited from being torn down. Also, there is no government funding that comes with the designation to help repair or preserve the building. What it does mean is that the site has been thoroughly researched, and with substantial documentation, that its worthiness as a significant structure is considered fully valid.At the center of Lebanon’s square stands the Boone County Courthouse. The stunning limestone and granite building was built over the course of two years, from 1909 to 1911. Consisting of four floors over a full basement, the overall height of the building from the lawn is 120 feet. The full height to the tip of the flagpole over the clock tower sets the mark at 140 feet in the sky.The placement of the building is significant as well. It is centered perfectly to be bisected by the second principal meridian (thought to be the only public building in the world with this distinction).Look for the markings on the street level first floor the next time you’re in, to experience one foot on either side of a major world marker for survey markings.  The dome is, of course, the crowning jewel of the impressive old building. At 52 feet in diameter, it is the second largest in the state. Only the famous West Baden dome at French Lick Springs Resort is larger at 200 feet in diameter. Standing inside the courthouse and looking up, the stained glass beauty is always changing with the shifting light from outdoors. Although one may think that this is a direct result of the sunlight or passing clouds, there is a filter between the colorful decorative panes and the outside elements. The courthouse dome is actually two separate structures. The outer protective shell is what we see when viewing the county seat from the exterior. This protects the more delicate decorative glass inner-dome, which is only visible from the main floor and balconies of the interior - but there is a way to see both of these at once.On a rarely granted tour, The Lebanon Reporter was given access to the rotunda balcony area with a special escort by the unofficial historian of the courthouse. After scaling a steep staircase and passing through a set of locked doors, we were at the absolute top of Boone County and permitted to photograph the near-secret space between indoors and out.Enjoy this photographic tour. At a later date we’ll visit the courthouse again for more up close views.

The Hussey-Mayfield Memorial Public Library, 250 N. Fifth St., offers a variety of events. Library staff can be reached by calling 317-873-8342 or by visiting the website at www.zionsville.lib.in. Events require registration, and registration is open unless otherwise noted.

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Reiko, pronounced Ree-I-Ko, Levy has been a Zionsville fixture at First Street Alterations since she and her husband decided to “retire” here in the early 1990s. That’s when she opened shop and started perfecting the fit and finish of clothing for loyal customers in the historic little berg.

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The life story of Melvina (pronounced Mel-Vine-Ah) Cox Brannard King, the last former slave living in Boone County, could have been easily lost to time. Then a serendipitous series of people and events brought her amazing story and living relatives together. We at The Lebanon Reporter are honored to share it here with our readers.

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It's hard to photograph local music icon John Stevens Jr. in action because he's surrounded by fans who dance and sing along with every song.

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A double pleasure awaits doll lovers this Saturday at the Thorntown Heritage Museum.

Reality has a habit of interrupting the stories people tell themselves. The 18th century philosopher George Berkeley constructed complex arguments to prove that matter doesn’t really exist. In response, Samuel Johnson famously kicked a rock and said, “I refute (him) thus.”

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One of the men found in a truck stop shower after stealing a Jeep has been sentenced to probation, according to court records. Whitestown Police Officer Dalton Tibbs found a stolen yellow Jeep Wrangler in the parking lot of T.A. Travel Center in Whitestown Oct. 3. He then noticed a green Jeep Wrangler parked next to it that was also reported stolen.

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Let’s cross a unique bridge on our tour of the structures and places listed on the National Register of Historic Places here in Boone County. As we progress on this tour, do bear in mind that listing on the Register does not guarantee an exemption from removal.At the northern border of Boone County and the southern edge of Clinton County, where the winding Sugar Creek meanders southwest, is Scotland Bridge. Although bonnie Scotland lies far across the ocean, and Scotland, Ind., is nowhere near Clinton or Boone counties (the little town is southwest of Bloomington), this part of the state was heavily settled by “Scotch-Irish” immigrants. So, since Lost Road exits Boone County leading travelers to the Scotland Christian Church (built in the mid 1890s) the bridge was named “Scotland.”Official maps and modern land surveys refer to Lost Road as County Road 200 East and identify Scotland Bridge as “Boone County Bridge No. 41.”By either name, the stone, one-lane bridge is among the oldest in Boone County. It has a long history mired by lore, spooky stories and admiration. Since it was first erected in 1901, the structure has been rebuilt twice according to Craig Parks, director of the Boone County Highway Department. Those makeovers happened in 1908 and 1911 after a barrage of highwater events. How could such an elegant old thing like Scotland Bridge be considered a curiosity? For starters, both the opinions and tales vary widely on how the road leading to it came to be dubbed “Lost.”  When paired with the uncommon appearance of the bridge, all theories about Lost Road and its bridge make for good storytelling around a campfire. A popular legend, like a Brigadoon of Boone, says that before the bridge was built, the road was actually an enchanted path. The story goes that the bewitched lane lured unsuspecting travelers into the realm of another dimension. Hapless victims were entranced, pulled across the waterway, and into the inside of a magical tree where they were made to stay overnight. The spell would persist until morning’s first light. Then the tree would expel them (some say it was a white oak, others, a sycamore) and the groggy folk would be sent on their way.Others believed that to ford at this spot was a risky adventure. Though shallow enough for crossing, the surrounding area was so swampy that a horse and rider could easily be swallowed by the boggy and bottomless creek. Some even claimed knowledge of a mule team and wagon that tried to cross in the early years of Boone County, but sunk into the water and was lost forever.  Perhaps the most plausible explanation for the name Lost Road may be based on the sinking horses stories. When early settlers came to the county, the land was indeed quite poorly drained. Because of this, it is feasible that there was no clearly defined continuation of the road on the opposite bank of the creek during seasons with generally wet conditions. Those crossing were said to have all entered into the water where the roadway met the creekbed to cross at the  shallows. But there were many exit points used along the other bank depending on weather conditions and the amount of rutting left behind by previous travelers.  As the only remaining “true masonry” bridge in Boone County (meaning the stone is structural, not just a decorative veneer), Scotland Bridge was originally built with four arches. When it needed repairs in 1908, the stone was salvaged and reused. During this revision only three arches were used. As noted at the top of the story, this is a Historic Register structure. However, in recent years the bridge has begun to crumble. The underside at both shorelines is losing the soil it stands on through erosion. Although the highway department has tried to keep up with repairs by adding rip rap to help abate further damage, the bridge is at a critical state in its lifespan.Currently, the Federal Highway Department and other agencies are performing an in-depth analysis of the structural integrity of the bridge and the community heritage value of Scotland Bridge. Signs were posted several months ago at the site to inform users that the discovery process had begun. Although the future of the stone arched bridge will not be determined for some time, things don’t look good. Many lovers of Boone County history have their fingers crossed hoping that Scotland Bridge and its legends can be saved.

The Indiana Department of Labor announced that Monsanto Company of Whitestown achieved STAR re-certification in the Indiana Voluntary Protection Program for workplace health and safety.

To request an update to the calendar, please email news@reporter.net

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Statewide observances this year are taking place to honor Indiana’s vote to ratify the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote in 1920. Although the first rallies for “suffrage” were held in the 1840s, national attention drifted away from women’s rights toward the urgent issue of growing tensions along the Mason-Dixon line.  After the CIvil War, women in Zionsville followed the lead of their Indianapolis sisters and formed the Zionsville Female Suffrage Society in 1870. They gathered for meetings at the old Methodist Church (now “The Sanctuary”). Eliza Alford Speer wrote a letter to the Patriot newspaper, inviting all women of the county to rally to “the cause.” The poetic prose was signed “Veritas,” meaning, truth, as a way of veiling her identity and protecting her from public scrutiny. Later, Speer was outed for her rebellious ideations.Boone County became quite well known as a cultural destination community at the turn of the 20th century. So much so, that when leaders of the world-wide Women’s Rights Movement came to Indiana in 1877 to speak, they chose Zionsville’s Clark Opera House over multiple Indianapolis venues for their appearance and lectures. It was 143 years ago, Feb. 3, 1877, that two celebrities arrived in town. Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton spoke together in the theater-styled second floor “opera house” over Benjamin F. Clark’s storefront in the center of downtown Zionsville. The internationally renowned women felt that the movement was in good hands in Indianapolis under the guidance of fellow suffragist May Wright Sewell, so they made their Indiana sweep in Boone County instead of Indy. Zionsville women were not the only ones involved in the issues of women. Lebanon school teacher and head of English for LHS Mayme Sheridan was elected as the first chair of the Lebanon Women’s Franchise League. This group had its roots in the suffrage and temperance movements in London, England. The Franchise League was organized in 1917, and quickly disbanded as a favorable legislation passed for the vote. Sheridan later married James Gardner, but died shortly after in 1924 of breast cancer. Her dream of having a voice via a vote was realized.

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The Zionsville Community High School Choralaires were named grand champions at the Pike MusicFest 2020 competition Saturday in the Pike Performing Arts Center in Indianapolis.

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Plans are underway for the third annual Bingo Fundraiser in memory of Carla Hopper Darrough, benefitting the Boone County Cancer Society.

Phil Chalmers is scheduled to make an appearance in Lebanon, March 10 at the Farm Bureau Community Building, 1300 E. 100 S.

County Road 500 South, west of C.R. 875 E., will be closed for three days beginning on or after Feb. 11.

The year 1920 was the beginning of Prohibition and suffragists celebrated the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote. On New Year’s Day, Lebanon chartered a Rotary Club.

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It’s a career that many high school students only dream about – or perhaps it never even crossed their minds.

The Zionsville Century Club has changed its February meeting day to Feb. 11 and will meet at 8:30 p.m. in the Zionsville American Legion.

County Road 500 S. west of C.R. 875 E. will be closed for three days beginning Feb. 6, depending on weather. The closure is for phase 1 of a gravity sewer project on CR 875 E. that extends south from the Zionsville School’s sport complex, just to the north.

Mention “Granville Wells” in 2020, and most folks think of the elementary school on Indiana 75 in the Western Boone School District. But about 100 years ago, people knew the “other” Granville Wells who was a local farmer, school teacher and Jamestown banker.Joseph Granville Wells was born to pioneer parents in Boone County in 1874. Both he and his wife, Anna Bernice Harting, grew up on farms less than a mile apart but did not meet before Wells began his career in education. Granville graduated from the Indiana State Teachers College (now Indiana State University) and went to work in Jackson Township School as the area’s school teacher. He was 18 years old then, and it was there that he met 12 year old Anna Bernice, who was one of his students. They married eight years later in 1901. The following year, their first and only child, Herman B Wells, was born.By then the pair were both teaching at Jamestown, though in those days, teachers were only employed for about six months out of the year. Granville kept up work at the family farm and at times also worked as a clerk in Lebanon’s Whittaker Jewelry and Clocks. After son Herman B (just the letter, not an initial) was born, Granville focused his career on banking. As a lifelong resident and principal of the Jamestown State Bank, Granville was very much an anchor of the community. The little family of three moved to Lebanon in 1917 so son Herman could attend LHS. The Wells family purchased the handsome home at 517 N. Meridian St. When Granville, Bernice and little Herman moved in, the house was painted a stately deep red - very popular at the time. Although the house is now freshly coated in white, it still stands.Granville maintained both his farming interests and his position as president of the Citizens State Bank of Jamestown. His daily commute of about a dozen miles over backroads took Granville more than 30 minutes in good weather. A year after coming to Lebanon, Wells agreed to fill the position of deputy treasurer for the county. The following year, while still maintaining his position at the Jamestown bank, he served two full terms as Boone County treasurer. Eventually, Granville and Anna Bernice gifted 20 acres of their Jackson Township farm to build a new school replacing the crumbling Jamestown and Advance schools in 1955. In appreciation for the couple’s generosity, community leaders named the new school where students attended from grades 1 through 12, “Granville Wells.”  Cookie Leeke of the Jackson Township Historical Society says her husband Bill made the big move from the old Jamestown school. The students thought they’d walked into a palace. Everything was new, bright, clean, and so very modern, she said.When Western Boone School Jr.-Sr. High School opened in the fall of 1974, three area schools were shuttered - Washington, Pinnell and Dover - and two - Granville Wells and Thorntown - became elementary schools. Those five schools are each represented in the school’s adopted 5-point star emblem - “Western Boone Stars.”  

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Obituaries

Jewell (Dodson) Roper, 93, of Indianapolis, passed away February 16, 2020. She was born in Fulton County, GA to the late Paul and Gertrude Dodson on June 13, 1926. Jewell was an underwriter for an insurance company for many years. She was predeceased by her parents, four sisters and four bro…